For the last two weeks, I’ve been introducing you to the animal factor… personalities for success.

You’ve met the lion… the A-Type personality and the monkey… the life of the party. AND… hopefully you’ve started to recognize some of these people in your circle of influence and in your prospecting efforts.

This week, I’m introducing you to the peaceful koala… the nurturer… the amiable relater. The personality temperament that is able to get along with everyone. I’m going to show you how to close an amiable relator.

So… let’s head further into the jungle and meet the koala!

Now, the koala personality temperament that makes up about 35% of the population and about 60% of all koalas are women. The koala bear is seen as the cuddly, warm, non-threatening creature. The koala personality, in the human form, is able to get along easily with all three personality types… the lion, the owl and the monkey.

And that’s primarily because of the koala’s low-key, easy-going, relaxed manner.

This is the kind of person that is able to adapt quite easily. The peaceful koala is the great leveler of all of the personalities and the easiest of all temperaments to get along with. He or she generally makes a very loyal friend.

Now…they may like their friends, but they’re also happy alone. The koala is the closest there is to being a balanced person… one which does not function in extremes or excesses of life, but walks solidly down the middle of the road, able to avoid conflict and decision on either side.

This type of person does not offend other people BUT is easily offended. They can be sensitive to criticism and they don’t like conflict. While the lion may be the born leader, the koala often times is the learned leader. And with proper motivation… he or she can rise to the top because of his or her outstanding ability to get along with everyone.

The dress characteristic of a koala would be loose, flowing clothing… generally, light colors or miss matched, or even comfortable clothes. Women who are primarily koala personality types, wear little or no make-up. They wear simple, uncomplicated hairstyles.

Can you identify any koalas in your circle of influence?  I hope so because you are going to find that they are a great asset to have as a friend, colleague or teammate. 

Let’s keep going and look at some of their strengths.

 

 

Strengths of the Koala

Some of the strengths that can help you identify a koala personality would be compassion and great concern for others. Koalas are the best listeners. They typically have a low-key personality, often are easy-going and relaxed… calm… cool and collected. They seek balance in life. They typically are consistent. They don’t always win big but win over the long haul. They have kind personalities and can be sympathetic and empathetic. They can take the good with the bad and they don’t get upset easily.

They’re competent, steady and agreeable. You would never see a pushy, loud or flamboyant koala. A koala would go out of his or her way to avoid conflict, unlike the lion that thrives on controversy.

They’re the best listeners of all personality types. They are friendly, enthusiastic creative, original and diplomatic. They make good eye contact and they’re good people persons. They are responsible, hard-working and conscientious.

They tend to be employed in helping jobs like teaching, counseling, social work and nursing. They strive to assist others and they’re excellent at counseling skills. And of the four personality types, this person is usually the best parent.

On the flip side, the koala’s temperament can be very annoying to the lion or the owl because they tend to be very low key. They work quietly to themselves. At times, they have difficulty making decisions.

Sometimes… this can absolutely drive the lion type personality crazy because the lion just wants them to make a decision but koalas like to discuss things.

When it comes to prospecting or marketing to the koala… it’s important that you take all of the traits and characteristics I’ve discussed so far into account. Let me enlighten you on how to market to the koala.

 

 

Marketing to the Koala

If you’re prospecting a koala for your business opportunity, it’s going to be very important for you to touch on all the benefits of team support to let them know that there’s a lot of other strong people and strong leadership that will be there to assist them.

Koalas are interested in how they’re going to be trained. They don’t operate from the seat of their pants… It’s too scary! The koala wants to know that there’s a plan for support and that they can work the plan.

The koala is not interested in getting out the machete and hacking down the jungle on their own. They’re very team oriented. They can be a great asset and often times, become the silent leader doing the little things to create the big things for everyone else.

When getting started in an income opportunity or business… a koala really wants to know that there’s someone dependable and stable to guide them because they’re not interested in going out in the jungle on their own. However, once in the jungle, they can become the leader.

If you’re communicating with the koala, tell them how much they can assist other people by being involved with your product or opportunity. They’re very good at helping other people…

…SO if there’s a place for them to help and have an impact on the environment or positive impact on people… that is the place to lead a koala.

Beware… there’s something you should know about the koala’s ability to make a decision.

 

 

The Decision Making Process

Koalas are intuitive but have challenges reaching that intuition because they’re too concerned they’re going to make a mistake. It takes them a lot of thought process to make their decisions and also they will ask other people for advice before they make the decision. The decision-making process is usually longer and drawn out than the monkey or the lion.

To find out where a koala is in the decision-making process… ask them how they feel.

How did you feel about the information?

How do you feel about what you just saw?

Can you see how you can contribute?

Do you see how you could be a part of our organization?

Do you see how we could really use someone like you in our company?

Do you see that you could assist us in making a difference?

Do you see how this product could really assist you in making a difference?

Would you like to assist us in our training program?

These are all hot buttons for the koala. And if you want to close him or her… you better know how to push those buttons.

 

 

Closing the Koala

So… you want to know how to close the koala?

Consider this…

Koalas love testimonials… which can be extremely effective in the sales process. They like to be able to relate to others and feel that there is a place for them.

They want to fit in… so what that means, is just let them know that they’re going to be an intricate part of your organization, your team, or your company.

Again, if you’re talking to a koala personality type, you’re not going to be able to talk to him or her like you would a lion. Aggressive people are a big turn off to a koala. Typically, the koala is not a big risk taker. They do not want to cut to the chase and get to the point.

You want to talk a little bit slower. Move a little bit slower. Don’t crowd them. Don’t rush them. A lot of times, they can even feel somewhat overwhelmed by a lot of information being thrown at them all at once.

Remember… koalas like to stay in their comfort zone, so they will accept change, but usually very slowly.

If you get a koala on the phone or have one sitting across from you, the best thing you could do is let them talk… even if it’s for a little longer than you would let one of the other personality types.

WHY?

Because they love to be heard. They want to know you care. They want to know you have a sincere interest and your interest better be sincere because they can tell when you’re faking it.

Here’s my last piece of insight in the closing process with this personality temperament….

The koala is motivated to take action… So let them know that they’re going to be involved with changing other people’s lives in a positive way or creating an impact.

Be sincere. 

Let them know there are tools, systems and support. And BE AWARE… if you attempt to use the take-away by telling them… “This might not be for you.” They might just agree with you.

 

(Did you miss last week’s blog post about the monkey? I’m sure he is still hanging around so… click here to read it now.)